A Reflection of Outbound Telemarketing through Classic Love Songs of the 70’s and 80’s


A Reflection of Outbound Telemarketing through Classic Love Songs of the 70’s and 80’s-done

There are reasons why people never forget songs from the past. First of all, they were written back when songwriters really wrote from the heart, when they used faithful words and metaphors of how they felt at that time. It is also because old songs are universal – although they may tell particular love stories, they may also be applied to almost anything in life.

Say, Outbound Telemarketing and Lead Generation?

Like a typical cycle of human emotions, Outbound Telemarketing and Lead Generation also follow a path where every action matters and could either be helpful or detrimental to the goal. It’s easy to understand how the Telemarketing process works by relating them to timeless songs:

Hello (Lionel Richie, 1984)

  • Of course, everything starts with a greeting. This initial contact is one of the most crucial parts of a Telemarketing call. If not done right, a professional telemarketer may not even get to proceed to anything at all.

Getting to Know Each Other (Gerard Kenny, 1980) –

  • Also a make or break stage, this is when the telemarketer tells something about his company and at the same time asks the prospect about certain details relevant to Lead Generation. Although it is not the actual sales pitch yet, asking the wrong questions or introducing impertinent points may ruin the conversation.

Words (Bee Gees, 1977) –

  • Words are all telemarketers have to take a prospect’s heart away. This is it – this is where the real stuff happens. The telemarketer discusses specific information on the goods or services or potential contract details. As expected, the telemarketer would also have to answer the prospect’s curious questions and clarifications.

It Might Be You (Stephen Bishop, 1983) –

  • Depending on the outcome of the product discussion, the prospect may now realize the benefits and likelihood of the proposal. He may give hints that he is interested and may be now ready to take things a step further.

I’d Really Love to See You Tonight (England Dan & John Ford Coley, 1976) –

  • Well, not tonight, but definitely in the future. This is when Appointment Setting is done, usually an in-person meeting with a Sales Executive or a phone call during the prospect’s preferred schedule.

The Search is Over (Survivor, 1985) –

  • The prospect’s meeting with the Sales Executive may seal the deal, and the Telemarketer’s mission is completed, unless otherwise if the deal was not made.

Don’t Throw it All Away (Bee Gees, 1978) –

  • If the prospect declined a business partnership, it’s still considered a lead, but one that has to be recycled and followed-up in the future. It goes back to the Telemarketers work list and may not be touched in the near future until a new need has developed.

Somewhere Down the Road (Barry Manilow, 1981) –

  • A sales call may not always turn out productive, but the good thing about it is that in this industry, “no” is not absolute. As long as Outbound Telemarketing services providers keep records of target information, there will always be opportunities and needs somewhere down the road, and when that time comes, the mission is reborn.